I’ve got some good news… and some bad news

It’s amazing what a month can do. Per usual, I took some time over Christmas and the New Year to step back from making videos, to relax and plan ahead. By this time of year, I’m usually a bit burned out and need a break. Come January, I’m back with big ideas and new videos.

This year is no different. I’m happy to share with you some news that I think could quite exciting, not just for me, but also for many of you.

Unfortunately, I’m also quite saddened by recent events in my life (and the life of the friars) to share something very sad.

Because I know that some people like their good news first while others like the bad news first, I’ve decided to create two videos, released them at the same time, and let you decide when you want to watch them. I’ve posted them both below, and they will both go live on Wednesday at 5:00pm.

Here’s the bad news:

Here’s the good news:

 

8 Comments on “I’ve got some good news… and some bad news

  1. I suppose you’ve seen some of the comments. Some of your followers are more than a little concerned, and they’ll stay that way at least until Wednesday. I already know the bad news and hope it won’t change the plan for “Breaking in the Habit.” On the other hand, I’m anxious to hear the “good news.” So I’ll settle down and be patient til Wednesday, difficult though that always is for me.

  2. Father Casey, who has devoted his life to the Lord: “As the shock is starting to wear off, sadness and anger are certainly taking its place, and honestly, I’m just left a little dumbfounded by the decision.”

    Snake Eyes, who has devoted his life to his country: “I went to lose myself in the mountains, just brooding and thinking too much– mostly about myself– which is a subject that always leads to trouble. It tends to put the center of the universe in the wrong place.”

    Father Casey, learn from Snake Eyes. Our lives are not about ourselves. We go where we are sent, we give all that we can, and we endure for whatever number of days God has allotted for us. Most of the time, we never even see the good results of our efforts. You have a great number of things to be thankful for, and nothing to be sad or angry about.

  3. Hang in there, you are young. I am 53 and in a deacon formation , A large class deacon formation. A shockingly large class. Not priest no but place holders and helpers to the priests. A bunch of guys many who realize maybe they ignored a calling years ago when they where your age. Many of our sons are now discerning that call. You guys, your age cohort need to hold the church together until we can correct the situation. It is not easy I know. In reality either we will correct it or we are closer to the end then we know. Our only mission, all of us, ordained, religious, laity is to get as many to heaven as we can and to do what we can to improve things here now for the pilgrims. Don’t let it get you down. The Holy Spirit will use you as needed. The enemy seems to have the upper hand now but we all know it is only temporary. Which ever way it works out here in earth we have already won through our Lord Jesus.

    Pax and God bless you

  4. Hi, just discovered your videos. Great. The “good news, bad news” videos kinda of hit me because of the situation we find ourselves in this year. With so many dioceses closed due to concerns about the Covid virus, we all might be feeling some of the same emotions you have been dealing with. God Bless your ministry.. pray for us.

  5. your doing a great job!! stay strong on this long road that you have chosen. my prayers are with you.

  6. As an Orthodox Christian, I really don’t understand the unevenly-applied prohibition on married priests in the RC church. Most Orthodox priests are married, although we have plenty of monastic priests as well. Notably, for hundreds of years, RC priests in Eastern Europe have been married, too. Why is there so much resistance to an ancient practice that has much to commend it and very little to criticize it? If the concern is the burden of family and children, then there could be an age requirement for married priests, as there is in Orthodoxy. The usual minimum age is 30; some men are ordained younger than that, but the average age at ordination in the US is closer to 40. Ministry and charitable work are the very things that many people turn to when they have finished the work of raising their own families, and the priesthood would be the perfect vocation for many such men.

  7. Are you doing any of these virtually this year? I’d love to talk to our church leadership about having you for a virtual visit to our parish, but I don’t know if you’re doing this.

  8. I watched your video about 5 movies you recommended. The Way and The Mission did not hit me as they did you but I’ll try again. I’ll also try the others you recommended. That said, you asked for our favorites but I didn’t see a place to reply, so I ended up here. Have you seen the Italian movie about Dr. Moscati? You must! I loved it because I felt like I was watching Christ in action through this doctor. And you can only love this character/Christ. Try it!

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