Where are Catholic Teachings in the Bible?

It is often said by fundamentalist Christians that Catholic doctrines are made up, that we’ve disregarded God’s Word to follow the laws of man. It’s utterly ridiculous. Catholics were the first Christians, and we were the ones who compiled the Bible. Anyone who has ever read a papal encyclical or official document of the Church knows that there are references to Scripture in every paragraph.

Everything we do finds its foundation in Scripture.

But that doesn’t mean that everything exists today just as it did 2000 years ago. The Church grows and develops. Implicit or minor teachings in the Bible took on flesh as the Church became greater aware of its mission. To suggest that every detail of what we do now is found in Scripture is not a fair claim—no Christian community could live up to that standard.

The problem, unfortunately, is that many Catholics (or other Christians) don’t know where the foundation is for many of our doctrines. In this week’s Catholicism In Focus, I offer the biblical foundation for some of our most contested beliefs, showing exactly where and why we believe what we do.

One Comment on “Where are Catholic Teachings in the Bible?

  1. Casey:

    Thank you for the video. I have a couple of concerns. First of all, it seems you have implied that praying to Mary is Biblical, but it is not. Second, while you say it is not mandatory to confess to a priest, the Roman Catholic church seems to say that you must confess to a priest to become Catholic, and before every mass. James says to confess to “one another”, and not necessarily to a priest.

    These may seem like minor discrepancies, but I believe that what the Roman Catholic church makes mandatory, but what the Buble does not explicitly say is mandatory, is what keeps many people from potentially becoming members of the Roman Catholic faith. What I see as what Jesus has done is take away rules, not impose a new set of rules. Could you explain this to me? Thank you. Take care.

    Leon

Leave a Reply to Leon Budziszewski Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: