Do Catholics Celebrate Magic?

To the outside observer, there is something mysterious about the Catholic mass. What with the funny costumes, various gestures, silent prayer, and even the Latin language, it would be easy to misconstrue what is going on with some magical incantation.

For just this, reason people have associated the origin of the phrase “Hocus Pocus” with the Catholic mass for centuries. While the actual origins of the phrase are unknown, all the way back in 1694 an Anglican priest suggested that it derived itself from the Latin phrase Hoc est enim corpus meum (this is my body) said during the Mass in Latin, a way for Protestants to make fun of Catholics. More recent speculators have even connected the “hokey pokey” dance to the same origin. And even though scholars have mostly debunked the former and completely debunked the latter, the fact that such ideas prevailed for centuries shows that there is at least an intuitive connection between the two. You can definitely see it being true, even if it isn’t.

Which presents an obvious question for us as Catholics: if what we are doing is not magic—and it most certainly is NOT—what is the difference between the sacraments and magic? An investigation of the two reveals differences in overall worldview, role of the minister, purpose of the ritual, and overall effect.

2 Comments on “Do Catholics Celebrate Magic?

  1. Magic, definition:
    “the power of apparently influencing the course of events by using mysterious or supernatural forces.” Since the act of consecration and transubstantiation is supposed to change bread and wine into the living body of almighty God, it seems to me to meet this definition of magic.

  2. No It is not a magic but a divine or spiritual procedure.

    On Mon, 10 Dec 2018, 7:35 pm Breaking In The Habit, wrote:

    > friarcasey posted: “https://youtu.be/ESH4XzJkOe4 To the outside observer, > there is something mysterious about the Catholic mass. What with the funny > costumes, various gestures, silent prayer, and even the Latin language, it > would be easy to misconstrue what is going on wi” >

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